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Which One To Choose? Lion Vs. Windows 8

Both Apple and Microsoft have significant presence in the computing world, although the former is more dominant in the mobile industry and the latter in consumer-level laptop/desktop industry. Microsoft constantly introduces changes in its Windows series, by incorporating all new interfaces, optimizations, improved touch supports and many others. Windows 8 offers a lot of goodies that can make consumers happy and it should be a worthy opponent to the Lion. Both Apple and Microsoft are working hard to win consumers and they work with any Intel-based configuration. However, the Lion is designed for Mac machines, while the Windows 8 should work on any x386 model that has enough hardware resources.

Windows 8 adds its own versatility by providing support for ARM devices. Microsoft has philosophically different approach and the Windows 8 blurs the distinction between mobile devices and desktops/laptops. Because Apple focuses on iOS for its mobile implementation, the Lion is still a platform for Mac and MacBook models. At the moment, we couldn’t tell which implementation is better, but they should work well in their own ways. Some users could lean towards Apple’s ways of doing things, while others’ prefer Microsoft’s stance in overcoming Apple’s steady presence in both industries. Clearly, Windows would have an ever-shrinking if it doesn’t do anything radical.

Which One To Choose Lion Vs. Windows 8

For long-time Windows users, the interface of Windows 8 should immediately charm them. It comes with gorgeous tile-based interface that works well on both desktop and tablet. For traditionalists, Windows 8 includes a standard desktop interface, although they may not be comfortable with the Office-like interface used by the venerable Windows Explorer.

After a period of use, it is quite clear that Windows 8 is significantly touch-oriented due to its gesture recognition and on-screen keyboard. Compared to its predecessors, Windows 8 comes with much improved handwriting recognition. Nevertheless, we need to write really well to make this feature work. It could be something that some people may never and they just can’t convince themselves to write on the display with the stylus. It may be a little late, but Microsoft has finally added the App Store functionality for its Windows OS and this would be a much-appreciated addition for tablet and touchscreen users.

On the other hand, the Lion is still a traditional desktop platform and it is not meant to be used on anything portable, except the MacBook series. Apple doesn’t have a plan to deliver an iPad model with full-blown Mac OS X software installed. It has a clear stance in this matter and perhaps it understands that a desktop operating system would be quite inconvenient to use on a touch-screen device, regardless of the modifications applied.

Unlike any Windows version, Lion and its predecessors work fantastic with trackpad and many users just can’t emphasize enough how wonderful it is to use the trackpad on their MacBook. It is very easy to take full control of the interface, such as rotate, zoom, switch between apps and open the Mission Control.